Six technology innovations in retail coming our way.

Six technology innovations

Let me share six technology innovations in retail coming our way that might change the way customers do their shopping.

 

Zulily Applies T.J. Maxx Model to E-Commerce by Ashley Lutz and Hayley Peterson @ dailyfinance.com

Similar to discount retailer T.J. Maxx, Zulily (ZU), founded in Seattle in 2010, creates a daily treasure hunt for the mothers who shop its site. While T.J. Maxx offers close-out discounts on various brands in its stores, Zulily’s website offers flash sales on apparel, home goods, toys, and more. The deals and constantly changing selection keep shoppers coming back, and the e-commerce site, which went public in 2013, has nearly 4 million users.

 

Carrefour trial indoor positioning using lighting by retail-innovation.com

Carrefour are trialling a connected lighting system with LED-based indoor positioning in a store in Lille, France. The lighting replaces its previous fluorescent lighting with 2.5 kilometres of energy efficient Philips LED lighting that uses light to transmit a location signal to a shopper’s smartphone, triggering an app to provide location-based services such as navigation and location aware offers.

 

Starbucks Revolutionizes Mobile Payments and Delivery by Ashley Lutz and Hayley Peterson @ dailyfinance.com

Starbucks (SBUX) is responsible for making coffee shops ubiquitous. Now the Seattle icon is leading the charge on mobile payments at its 21,000 locations. The company’s mobile app allowed customers to pay for their coffee beverages by smartphone before Apple Pay. An impressive 16 percent of transactions are now mobile. The company is also testing delivery in Seattle and New York.

 

Lowe’s Pushes Innovations To A New High by Avi Dan @ Forbes.com

Last year Lowe’s made fabric swatches and paint samples obsolete when it came to decorating. The home improvement store has built, what it dubs, a “holoroom.” It uses 3-D technology and augmented reality to allow customers to “walk” through a floor plan of their dream home. In the 20-foot by 20-foot specially designed room, customers can move anything from furniture to toilets and swap out floors and paint colors with the swipe of a finger on an iPad.

 

EDITD Shows Real-Time Purchases by Ashley Lutz and Hayley Peterson @ dailyfinance.com

EDITD is a technology company that helps retailers like Target (TGT), Gap (GPS) and Asos have “the right products, at the right place, at the right time.” The English company tracks what people are buying in real time. This helps retailers make better merchandising decisions and restock items faster.

 

Voice operated shopping Apps by Zoe Wood @ The Guardian

“Tesco, I want the same shopping as last week and I want it delivered on Thursday at 9pm.” If only buying your groceries online was as easy as barking an order at your phone. Mark Loosemore, commercial director of “voice assistant” technology firm Capito Systems, thinks it soon will be. “This is very, very new but we think this technology has quite broad applications,” he says. “We find that young people are much quicker to have a go than perhaps people who grew up with a desktop.”


Five Retail Innovations coming our way.

Five Retail innovations coming our wayLet me share five retail innovations coming our way that might change the way customers do their shopping.


Navigating the Supermarket in Super Style by Lou Carlozo @ foxbusiness.com

The smartphone has all but replaced the standalone GPS as a product in the average consumer’s tech arsenal. That’s because mapping apps from Google, Apple, and Waze help us get from point A to B. Ah, but they don’t do it indoors. Molloy sees a time in the not-too-distant future when app developers figure out how to map your favorite grocery store or retail store, so that you can just enter your grocery list, for example, and the app does the rest. “You can imagine a GPS that would take you on the most efficient course, where the store knows the things you buy and leads you there,” he says.

In Denmark, supermarket crowdsources suggestions for local products by Chris Kreinczes @ forbes.com

As concerns grow over food air miles, and more consumers want to buy local, SuperBrugsen in Denmark has come up with a novel way of ensuring that the produce they stock will appeal to eco-minded consumers. Through their website, customers can suggest particular local items they would like the store to stock, after which managers will taste-test the items to ensure their quality. A clever way to use customer crowdsourcing to ensure that the store only stocks items that will sell. The crowds have also been put to good effect in the Netherlands through the Avoid The Shopping Crowds app that analyzes social media feeds to tell the user how busy a shop is before they enter it. Both businesses use crowdsourced data to improve real life experience.

Try on augmented reality Lacoste shoes in store by retail-innovation.com

Lacoste have launched a mobile app which helps make styling your outfit with a pair of shoes a little quicker and a little more fun. Customers simply scan trigger images in-store to quickly try on a selected shoe and interact with additional content. Customers can also take photos and share them with friends on Facebook, Twitter and email. The application which uses product photos captured in 3D will be used in Lacoste’s stores, as well as concessions in department stores.

‘Colourmatic’ Window Display Advises on How to Enliven Your Outfit by creativity-online.com

New Zealand fashion retailer AS Colour, along with agency FCB Auckland, has launched a new technology designed to help consumers add spice to their wardrobes, while drawing them into its stores. The brand has launched Colourmatic, a “virtual stylist” digital display that can examine shoppers’ outfits.

Consumers stand before the display at the brand’s AS Colour Britomart store in New Zealand. It will rate their outfits on a scale of 1-100 and will determine originality and freshness, point out “weak link” pieces, whether or not everything harmonizes, and give them advice on what colors and pieces they should be mixing into their wardrobes. The recommendations, of course, are available steps away, through the doors of the AS Colour store.

“When it comes to making style decisions, many shoppers struggle to know exactly what they are looking for,” said AS Colour Art Director Stephen Richardson in a statement. “The Colourmatic acts as your own personal fashion critic, identifying where you need help and providing solutions.”

According to the agency, sales are up 16% since the launch of the campaign, and people who used the Colourmatic have improved their outfits by an average of 28%.

Amazon’s two-day-delivery program by J.J. MCCORVEY @ fastcompany.com

Last year, Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos told Fast Company, “The balance of power continues to shift toward consumers and away from companies.” One exception: Amazon itself, which amasses more power daily. Membership of its two-day-delivery program, Amazon Prime, grew by millions in 2013; its grocery-delivery service expanded to Los Angeles and San Francisco, hooking customers into regular delivery habits; and its Kindle Fire HDX, with an instant tech support feature, became an attractive alternative to the iPad. Competitors such as eBay try to compete, but Amazon’s Sunday-delivery partnership with the U.S. Postal Service—and its lofty promise of 30-minute drone delivery by 2015—put it far, far ahead. Yet Bezos still believes that it’s day one for the e-commerce giant. “There’s still so much you can do with technology to improve the customer experience,” he told Fast Company in September. “That’s the sense in which I believe it’s still day one, and that it’s early in the day. If anything, the rate of change is accelerating.” But with the combination of Amazon Prime, AmazonFresh, and the widespread fulfillment centers, it looks like Amazon is still going to be near impossible to catch.

As a comment, let me say that all text was used copy & paste from its original published place.