Five Retail Innovations coming our way.

Five Retail innovations coming our wayLet me share five retail innovations coming our way that might change the way customers do their shopping.


Navigating the Supermarket in Super Style by Lou Carlozo @ foxbusiness.com

The smartphone has all but replaced the standalone GPS as a product in the average consumer’s tech arsenal. That’s because mapping apps from Google, Apple, and Waze help us get from point A to B. Ah, but they don’t do it indoors. Molloy sees a time in the not-too-distant future when app developers figure out how to map your favorite grocery store or retail store, so that you can just enter your grocery list, for example, and the app does the rest. “You can imagine a GPS that would take you on the most efficient course, where the store knows the things you buy and leads you there,” he says.

In Denmark, supermarket crowdsources suggestions for local products by Chris Kreinczes @ forbes.com

As concerns grow over food air miles, and more consumers want to buy local, SuperBrugsen in Denmark has come up with a novel way of ensuring that the produce they stock will appeal to eco-minded consumers. Through their website, customers can suggest particular local items they would like the store to stock, after which managers will taste-test the items to ensure their quality. A clever way to use customer crowdsourcing to ensure that the store only stocks items that will sell. The crowds have also been put to good effect in the Netherlands through the Avoid The Shopping Crowds app that analyzes social media feeds to tell the user how busy a shop is before they enter it. Both businesses use crowdsourced data to improve real life experience.

Try on augmented reality Lacoste shoes in store by retail-innovation.com

Lacoste have launched a mobile app which helps make styling your outfit with a pair of shoes a little quicker and a little more fun. Customers simply scan trigger images in-store to quickly try on a selected shoe and interact with additional content. Customers can also take photos and share them with friends on Facebook, Twitter and email. The application which uses product photos captured in 3D will be used in Lacoste’s stores, as well as concessions in department stores.

‘Colourmatic’ Window Display Advises on How to Enliven Your Outfit by creativity-online.com

New Zealand fashion retailer AS Colour, along with agency FCB Auckland, has launched a new technology designed to help consumers add spice to their wardrobes, while drawing them into its stores. The brand has launched Colourmatic, a “virtual stylist” digital display that can examine shoppers’ outfits.

Consumers stand before the display at the brand’s AS Colour Britomart store in New Zealand. It will rate their outfits on a scale of 1-100 and will determine originality and freshness, point out “weak link” pieces, whether or not everything harmonizes, and give them advice on what colors and pieces they should be mixing into their wardrobes. The recommendations, of course, are available steps away, through the doors of the AS Colour store.

“When it comes to making style decisions, many shoppers struggle to know exactly what they are looking for,” said AS Colour Art Director Stephen Richardson in a statement. “The Colourmatic acts as your own personal fashion critic, identifying where you need help and providing solutions.”

According to the agency, sales are up 16% since the launch of the campaign, and people who used the Colourmatic have improved their outfits by an average of 28%.

Amazon’s two-day-delivery program by J.J. MCCORVEY @ fastcompany.com

Last year, Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos told Fast Company, “The balance of power continues to shift toward consumers and away from companies.” One exception: Amazon itself, which amasses more power daily. Membership of its two-day-delivery program, Amazon Prime, grew by millions in 2013; its grocery-delivery service expanded to Los Angeles and San Francisco, hooking customers into regular delivery habits; and its Kindle Fire HDX, with an instant tech support feature, became an attractive alternative to the iPad. Competitors such as eBay try to compete, but Amazon’s Sunday-delivery partnership with the U.S. Postal Service—and its lofty promise of 30-minute drone delivery by 2015—put it far, far ahead. Yet Bezos still believes that it’s day one for the e-commerce giant. “There’s still so much you can do with technology to improve the customer experience,” he told Fast Company in September. “That’s the sense in which I believe it’s still day one, and that it’s early in the day. If anything, the rate of change is accelerating.” But with the combination of Amazon Prime, AmazonFresh, and the widespread fulfillment centers, it looks like Amazon is still going to be near impossible to catch.

As a comment, let me say that all text was used copy & paste from its original published place.

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